Integrating Himawarii observations | Curtin’s Remote Sensing & Satellite Research Group

Integrating Himawarii observations

Himawari 8 products for the Australian Environment: A case study for the TERN/ AusCover project

The Advanced Himawari lmager (AHI) on board the geostationary Himawari 8 satellite is a 16 band imager (spanning 0.430 μm - 13.4 μm) positioned at about 140° east. The imager collects visible and infrared data at 0.5, 1 and 2 km spatial resolutions and 10 minute temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of the AHI and number of spectral bands is arguably comparable to those of the MODIS sensors with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 km spatial resolution across 36 spectral bands (spanning 0.405 μm - 14.385 μm). As such, the AHI has great potential to deliver earth observation products similar to the daily products currently derived from MODIS data, but at an unprecedented temporal resolution allowing us to study diurnal cycles.


HimawariiAngles

Full disk view of earth as seen from Himawari-8 with different target areas. Green rectangles: (top) North-Eastern Japan Area and (bottom) South-Western Japan Area, Red square: flexible target area. White rectangles: flexible Landmark areas. The satellite view angle (θv) is shown for the whole disk with θv at 140.7 °E.  From Fearns et al., in preparation


This project aims at integrating AusCover remotely sensed datasets from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor with Himawari-8, Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) datasets to study the feasibility of AHI sensor in deriving the land surface products—Land surface temperature (LST) and vegetation stress index across multiple spatial and temporal resolutions. 
AHI surface reflectance will also be produced and compared with AusCover MODIS 19-band and MOD09 17-band surface reflectance products. The spatial resolution of the AHI and number of spectral bands is arguably comparable to those of the MODIS sensors with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 km spatial resolution across 36 spectral bands (spanning 0.405 μm - 14.385 μm). As such, the AHI has great potential to deliver earth observation products similar to those currently derived from MODIS data.

The broad aim of this project was to demonstrate the potential of AHI data for monitoring terrestrial environmental products in Australia. Two regions in WA, representing a number of different land surface types, were selected for the preliminary demonstration (See Fig. 1 below).


This project developed an atmospheric correction approach to derive surface spectral reflectance which was then compared to MODIS and Landsat-8 data. NDVI derived from the AHI, MODIS and Landsat-8 sensors was also compared. We also investigated Land Surface Temperature (LST), derived from AHO thermal bands, and how this changes throughout the diurnal cycle (See Fig. 2). The high temporal resolution NDVI and LST may be useful products in studies of vegetation stress. 


This is a work under progress. 

Further results will be posted here when available for display.

Partners on this project:

- Dr. Passang Dorji & Dr. Peter Fearns, AusCover Perth Node, Curtin University, Perth, WA

- Dr. Brendon McAtee, Innovation Facilitator, AusIndustry, Perth, WA

- Dr. Luigi Renzullo, CSIRO Land and Water, Canberra, ACT

- Dr. Mark Broomhall, Curtin University (Adjunct), Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Vic.

- Dr. J. Davies, SSEC, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA

Remote Sensing and Satellite Research Group, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102
[Designed with Karelia SandVox® and the Apex design from blueball design ®] © RSSRG 2017 Site map here